Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment Then and Now

I talk a lot about the revolutionary changes in RA treatment. This week on HealthCentral, I went into some more depth about how, specifically, RA treatment has changed:

"Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.


The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis."

  

Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.

The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
- See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/c/80106/170060/rheumatoid#sthash.EbKdlztz.dpuf
Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.
The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.

The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
- See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/c/80106/170060/rheumatoid#sthash.EbKdlztz.dpuf
Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.

The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
- See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/c/80106/170060/rheumatoid#sthash.EbKdlztz.dpuf
Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.

The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
- See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/c/80106/170060/rheumatoid#sthash.EbKdlztz.dpuf
Receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) used to mean an inevitable deterioration into joint damage, deformity and disability. Receiving an RA diagnosis now means a much better chance for remission or low disease activity so you can lead a better life. Today, I’ll take a look at the changes in the approach to treating RA and what it means for you.

The Pyramid
The traditional approach to treating RA was a stepped up pyramid (1). When first diagnosed, you would be prescribed NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Voltaren or Orudis) and nothing else for a long time. When that didn’t work, you might be upgraded to steroids and down the road, perhaps gold shots. Much further down this road, you might be prescribed Plaquenil. The key phrase governing this approach was “go low and go slow.” Unfortunately, while you were going low and slow, the disease was going fast and furious, eating up the cartilage in your joints, causing damage that affected your ability to move on a permanent basis.
- See more at: http://www.healthcentral.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/c/80106/170060/rheumatoid#sthash.EbKdlztz.dpuf

Comments

jaspreet singh said…
Arthritis really make the life like it stopping and yes there are many proven ways which you can use to get rid of this problem .


Arthritis treatment